Native Plants  |  

Why Native Plants? Missouri Native Plant Society

Why do I need a diversity of natives in my yard?
Exerpt from The Chickadee’s Guide to Gardening: In Your Garden, Choose Plants That Help the Environment By DOUGLAS W. TALLAMY, MARCH 11, 2015 a professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware, is the author of “Bringing Nature Home” Please google Douglas Tallamy.
“But local insects have only just met Bradford pears, in an evolutionary sense, and have not had the time — millennia — required to adapt to their chemical defenses. And so Bradford pears stand virtually untouched in my neighbor’s yard.
In the past, we thought this was a good thing. After all, Asian ornamentals were planted to look pretty, and we certainly didn’t want insects eating them. We were happy with our perfect pears, burning bushes, Japanese barberries, porcelain berries, golden rain trees, crape myrtles, privets, bush honeysuckles and all the other foreign ornamentals.
Playing God in the Garden : By planting productive native species, we can create life.
But there are serious ecological consequences to such choices, and another exercise you can do at home makes them clear. This spring, if you live in North America, put up a chickadee nest box in your yard. If you are lucky, a pair of chickadees will move in and raise a family. While they are feeding their young, watch what the chickadees bring to the nest: mostly caterpillars. Both parents take turns feeding the chicks, enabling them to bring a caterpillar to the nest once every three minutes. And they do this from 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. for each of the 16 to 18 days it takes the chicks to fledge. That’s a total of 350 to 570 caterpillars every day, depending on how many chicks they have. So, an incredible 6,000 to 9,000 caterpillars are required to make one clutch of chickadees.”
Why do I need to plant local-source native plants?
All native flowers are good food source for native pollinators like bees, butterflies and in turn, birds; they have evolved with one another. Fall blooming natives are especially important in nourishing the migrating insects and preparing the adults and caterpillars for winter. Cultivars from Box Stores are not good for wildlife.
The best plan for a pollinator garden is to plant a diversity of native plants; perhaps 30 different native species grown from a local seed source. It is important to read this article and some of the additional links provided within it. Enter this link: https://www.ecobeneficial.com/2015/07/why-locally-sourced-locally-grown-native-plants-matter/
In this case “local” means within 50 miles N<->S, and 100 miles E<->W. Consult a NPS member if you are enticed to get plants from beyond this region.
Find local professional assistance in the Grow Native Resource guide at www.grownative.org.
Within the Grow Native site, you will also find links to a Native Plant Database which not only lists hundreds of useful plants for your garden but explains the invasive plants and the natives with which you can replace them. There are over 20 articles explaining the need to plant natives for pollinators and birds, and a Seedling Identification page for 40 species commonly used in gardens so you won’t pull them up thinking they are invasive weeds.
Ask a member who talked to you at the booth or learn more by joining the local Hawthorn Chapter Missouri Native Plant Society at www.columbianativeplants.org
In this diagram, your yard sod is the first on the left. All others are native plants. Yes, they penetrate hardpan clay.
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Instructions for planting perennials in hot, dry weather
 Soak the soil, slowly, where you will be planting.
 Dig the hole about twice as wide and deep as the size of the container.
 Amend the soil [clay] in the hole with some kind of decomposed biological stuff [= decomposed compost, manure, leaves] but nothing with a high nitrogen content. This necessitates breaking clay into small chunks and mixing with compost. DO NOT use a peatmoss potting mix to amend the planting site.
 Soak the potted plant before planting.
 After removing the plastic pot, set plant in hole so crown is ABOVE ground level.
 Press soil/compost around plant FIRMLY [not hard-packed]. Wild perennials’ roots do NOT grow through air spaces.
 Put a shallow layer of garden soil over the top of the mix the plant is in. If this step is missed, Sun/heat/wind will dry the block of medium the plant started in and it will die quickly.
 Gently pour a bucket of water into/over the hole and new plant until it is ‘full’.
 Use your foot to press the undisturbed soil from outside > in, around the plant.
 If your foot sinks into the mud, you need more dirt to fill the air pockets. Most upland native plants do not appreciate being below the natural soil level.
 Add water and repeat until bubbles stop coming up.

 Usually about 3-4 gallons is enough to mulch each new plant. Cover the planting site with about 2-3 inches [ = second knuckle to crotch of middle finger]. Pull mulch away from crown of new plant.
 Before successive watering of your new plant, stick a finger through the mulch to test for dampness. If clay comes out on the tip of your finger, the plant probably is OK. Soak plant if finger comes out clean. Water thoroughly if plant is droopy.
 After a hard freeze, mark the plant. Sometime during the winter add 1-2 inches of mulch. Native perennials will come up through loose mulch. Wood chips keep nitrogen and weed seeds busy so they germinate weakly and are easy to pull if they come up at all.
 Depending on the natural needs of your new native perennial and rainfall, you might not need any more care of your plant. Usually after 2 years, if your plant is thriving , besides mulching once each winter, it will need no more care.
 Contact the Hawthorn Chapter of Missouri Native Plant Society www.columbianativeplants.org for more information. You receive regular information if you join the group. See site for membership options.
 We reuse/recycle all nursery plastic if you bring it to one of our activities
Membership benefits
 Learn to identify and grow native plants through field trips and workshops.
 Field trips to see wildflowers and rich natural communities including glades, prairies, and forests.
 Presentations by invited speakers at meetings.
 Share information about the benefits of native plants.
 Monthly newsletters from the Hawthorn Chapter and bi-monthly newsletters from the state MONPS.
 Meet others who share these interests

“The purpose of the Hawthorn Chapter of the Missouri Native Plant Society is to promote the enjoyment, preservation, conservation, restoration, and study of flora native to Missouri, public education of the value of the native flora and its habitat, and publication of related information.” –– MONPS, Hawthorn Chapter, bylaws, Art.1, Sec. 2.
MEMBERSHIP FORM
Missouri Native Plant Society
Hawthorn Chapter
www.columbianativeplants.org
Membership Levels:
___ Student $11
___ Regular $16
___ Contributing $26 (designate extra for chapter or state contribution)
Includes both Chapter and State dues.
Annual renewal on July 1.
Make check payable to:
Native Plant Society.
Name _____________________________________
Address ___________________________________
___________________________________
Phone: Day ________________________________
Evening ________________________________
Email: ____________________________________
All communications will come by email unless you say you want the Petal Pusher to be mailed on paper at a cost of $10. Circle one.
Email Regular Mail
Send check and this form to:
Paula Peters
2216 S. Grace Ellen Dr
Columbia, MO 65202
Missouri Native Plant Society
Hawthorn Chapter
Promoting the conservation and enjoyment of the native flora of Missouri

______________________________________________

To View PDF Version Click Here

Gardening for Birds  |  May 02, 2020

Bird Man Mel’s Favorite Plants

Bird Man Mel’s Favorite Plants

 

PERENNIALS

Coneflowers (purple & yellow – Native variety) – Finches, Hummingbirds & Butterflies

American Bittersweet (Native variety) – Bluebirds

Cardinal Flower (wet areas – Native variety) – Hummingbirds

Columbine (early bloomer – Native variety ) – Hummingbirds

New England Aster (Native variety) – Monarch Butterflies & Songbirds

Butterfly Milkweed (Native variety – Monarch Butterflies, other Butterflies & Pollinators

Blue False Indigo (Native variety) – Bumble Bees, Birds, Small Mammals

Ninebark – Pollinators, Birds & Butterflies

Buttonbush – Butterflies, Songbirds & Beneficial Insects

Eastern Redbuds – Birds, Bees & Butterflies

Joe-Pye Weed – Butterflies

Beebalm – Hummingbirds

Drop Me Scarlet Honeysuckle – Hummingbirds

Trumpet Vine – Hummingbirds

 

ANNUALS

 

Cigar Plant – Hummingbirds

Fuchsia Basket – Hummingbirds

Penta – Hummingbirds & Butterflies

Lantana – Hummingbirds

Cardinal Climber – Hummingbirds

Impatiens (shade) – Hummingbirds

Geranium (Red) – Draws in Hummers – Not a great nectar plant

Coreopsis – Songbirds, some Butterflies

Salvia (also perennials) – Hummingbirds & Songbirds

Petunia (only open-throated red ones) – Hummingbirds

Zinnias (particularly red ones) – Butterflies, Hummingbirds & Songbirds

Sunflowers – Songbirds

Q & A, Shopping  |  April 30, 2020

Attracting Cardinals and other Western Songbirds Product List

Below is a list of products described in the “Attracting Cardinals” seminar. They can all be purchased at Songbird Station. Not local? Contact us and we will help locate your local wild bird supplier.
Item
ALLIEDPR4WW Water Wiggler Standard
ANCIENT60325 Cardinals Galvanized
ANCIENT60327 Cardinals Flamed
AP33946 Wildflowers of the Northeast Playing Cards
AP35285 Cardinals
AP35339 C is for Cardinal
AP72615 Cardinals Blank Journal Lined
ASPECTS062 Cardinal Pair Window Thermometer
ASPECTS278 Vista-Dome
BS-410 Bottle Stopper – Cardinal
COBANEC399 Northern Cardinal Ornament
COBANEC413 Female Cardinal Ornament
GE105 Large Cardinal Circle Window Panel
GE115 Small Cardinal Circle Window Panel
GE141 Cardinal Sun Catcher
GE142 Cardinal Wind Chime
GE157 Cardinal Hook
GE180 Cardinal Bird Feeder
GE266 Cardinal Nightlight
GE400 Stocky Cardinal Keyholder
LOOF8005 Cardinal
NWBWF3 Bamboo Tray Feeder
PTF2010 Superior Blend 11.75 oz
REGAL11972 Bird Feeder Stake – Cardinal
REGAL12274 Cardinal Decor
REGAL12548 Bird Solar Lantern Cardinal
SE3880059 Cardinal Gord-O Bird House
SE5039 Perching Cardinals Bird Bath withStand
SE504 Mini Hanging Bird Bath Green
SE508 Classic 17 Garden Bird Bath
SE530 9 x 9 Hanging Tray Feeder
SE531 9 x 9 Clear Cover
SE995 Songbird Spa
SEFWC010 Cardinal Pin
SEHHHAPL Heart Fruit Feeder
SERUBGFR100 Ground Feeder Roof
SERUBHF55 Recycled Plastic Small Hopper Feeder
SERUBLHPF105 Hanging Platform Feeder
SERUBSFTR Small Red Fly-Thru Hopper
SERUBSPF100 Ground Platform Feeder Green
SERUBTF105 Tube Feeder with seed Tray
SESEED100GC Cardinal Chorus, 5 lb. + FREIGHT
WINDA1 Maple Leaf (4 per package)
WINDA3 Butterfly Decal (4 per package)
WINDA5 Hummingbird Decal (4 per package)
WINDA8 Square Decal
WINDA9 Leaf Medley Decal
WINDSBA Stop Bird Attack Window Spray
WL28715 Rustic Farmhouse Platform Wood Feeder
WR18221 Cardinal

Attracting Birds, Orioles  |  April 11, 2020

Tips for Attracting Orioles

Tips for Attracting Orioles

Click here for full brochure – Oriole TIPs

Because of their strikingly beautiful black and orange
or yellow plumage, their distinctive whistle, spring
songs, and their amazing suspended nest, Orioles are
quickly becoming one of America’s favorite birds. While
over eight species of Orioles can regularly be seen in the
United States, we’ll deal mainly in this flyer with three
species: Baltimore, Bullocks, and Orchard (range maps
on back page). All United States Orioles show variation
on the theme of black and orange or yellow plumage.

Except for in the Southeast, all Orioles are tropical
migrants. While migrations vary from year-to-year,
Orioles generally arrive in the South in early spring,
Midwest in early May, and further North soon afterward.
It is very important that you have Oriole feeders up and
ready, or often they will pass you by for better feeding
grounds. It is equally important to have nesting
materials out and ready to help encourage Orioles to
nest in your yard. Although studies are still being done
on how much we can tempt Orioles to nest in backyards,
by summer’s end, migrating Orioles are headed back
south to their tropical winter homes in Central and South
America. It does appear that Baltimore Oriole’s ranges
are expanding, while Bullocks and Orchard Orioles are
declining. All Orioles need and benefit from your help.

 

Orioles  |  

Orioles Seminar – Products

Below is a list of products described in the “Attracting Orioles” seminar. They can all be purchased at Songbird Station. Not local? Contact us and we will help locate your local wild bird supplier.

SE905 Ultimate Oriole Feeder
SEBCO212 Jelly/Jam Feeder
SEHHORFJ Oriole Fruit & Jelly Feeder
SERUBFJF Fruit&Jelly Oriole Fdr Orange
BE146 Petite Oriole Feeder
BE147 Double Fruit & Jelly Feeder
BE150 Oriole Bistro
AP35315 Orioles (book) 
CF98557 Hum/Oriole Fdr Clnr Spry 16oz
GEF1001 Sunflower Mesh Feeder
GEF1003 Black & White Cat Mesh Feeder
SE8012 12″ Limb Protecter
SE7030 4oz Birdbath Protector 
SE7034 8oz Birdbath Protector
BE200 4″ S-Hook w/1″ Opening
BE201 6″ S-Hook with 1″ Opening
BE202 12″ S- Hook with 1″ Opening
BE203 12″ Extension Hook 
PTF1080 Orange Suet Dough 12 oz
PD25154 24 inch Flying Oriole Spinner
SE102 Deluxe Green Suet Basket
SE630 8 oz. Oriole Nectar
SE645 24 oz Oriole Nectar
SEBCO230 Fliteline Junior 30 oz OrioleD
SEBCO243 Fliteline 52oz Oriole 
SESQ83O Oriole Magnet 12″ Baffle
BE100 Black Metal Window Hanger
SE2170722 Therm Sm! Bird Bait Oriole
SEFWC105 Oriole
SERUBSWFR Red Suet Window Feeder
SEHH12HK 12″ Copper Ivy Hang Decor
BE301 Floating Leaf Solar Bubbler
SEHHHAPL Heart Fruit Feeder
SEHHFRJL Fruit and Jelly Feeder
SERUBOR100 Oriole Diner Feeder
SERUBOR200 Diamond Oriole Feeder

Hummingbirds  |  April 04, 2020

Hummingbird Feeder Fresh Nectar Defender

Feeder Fresh Nectar Defender is an all-natural product that protects the freshness of hummingbird nectar and stops spoilage. It is bird-safe and works using a micronutrient naturally consumed by hummingbirds in their diet of nectar and insects. Feeder Fresh ND will protect your nectar for weeks, and hummingbirds will enjoy fresh nectar every time they visit your feeder. Simply add a small amount to your current nectar. One bottle lasts an entire season. It contains no artificial preservatives or dyes. Once you try Feeder Fresh ND, you will never want to feed hummingbirds without it. Patent pending.

Hummingbirds  |  

Hummingbird Suncatcher Craft for Kids

Items Needed:
Glue Sticks
Parchment Paper
Markers/Water Color Paint
Scissors

Instructions:

  1. Cut the desired amount of parchment paper
  2. Trace all parts of the hummingbird onto the parchment paper. I used a pencil.
  3. Color each part with markers or watercolor paint.
  4. Cut each body part out.
  5. Glue the beak onto the head, then the head onto the body, then the wing, then the tail. The tail will be the only one to be glue underneath.
  6. Hang hummingbird in the window.

Hummingbird Suncatcher Template

Attracting Birds, Hummingbirds  |  April 02, 2020

Tips for Attracting Hummingbirds

Click to View Hummingbird TIPs

In the United States, you can find over 16 kinds of Hummingbirds. For people east of the Rockies, the most prevalent by far is the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird. In fact, the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird is the most widely distributed of the world’s 338 species of Hummingbirds, all of which occur ONLY in the Western Hemisphere.

The Ruby-Throated Hummingbird is often found between woodland and meadow; however, it has adapted well to human development, but only if there is shelter, space, and food. It is frequently seen in suburban backyards with mature trees and shrubs, in wooded parks, and around farmsteads.

The Keys to Attracting Hummingbirds are to provide Food, Help for Nesting, and Misters (Water) for them to fly through. Providing natural plants that bloom from Spring through Fall is one of the best ways to attract hummers to your yard! Read on and learn how to make your yard a “Hummingbird Haven©.”

Attracting Birds, Nesting, Bird Watching  |  March 30, 2020

REQUIREMENTS FOR YOUR FAVORITE CAVITY-NESTING BIRDS

© NestWatch / The Cornell Lab of Ornithology / https://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/dealing-with-predators/

Species Nesting Habitat Box Height Hole Size Minimum Spacing
American Kestrel Pastures, fields, meadows, or orchards with mowed or grazed vegetation; place boxes on lone trees in fields, on trees along edges of woodlots, and on farm buildings. Facing south or east 10-30 feet 3″ diameter 1/2 mile
Ash-throated Flycatcher Chaparral, mesquite thickets, oak scrub, dry plains spotted with trees or cacti, deserts, and open deciduous and riparian woodlands 3-20 feet 1 3/4″ round 200 feet
Barn Owl Prefers open areas like fields, deserts and marshes which are in close proximity to hollow trees, cliffs, riverbanks, or man-made structures, including barns, bridges and other accessible sites, and which support healthy rodent populations 8-25 feet 3 3/4″ x 4 1/2″ elliptical 100 feet
Black-capped Chickadee Forests, woodlots, and yards with mature hardwood trees, forest edges, meadows; area should receive 40-60% sunlight, hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1″ wood shavings can be placed in box 5-15 feet 1 1/8″ round 650 feet
Brown-headed Nuthatch Open stands of pine-hardwood forests, clearings scattered with dead trees, forest edges, burned areas, cypress swamps 5-10 feet 1″ round 1 box per 6 acres
Carolina Chickadee Forests, woodlots, and yards with mature hardwood trees, forest edges, meadows; area should receive 40-60% sunlight, hole should face away from prevailing wind. Unlike other chickadees, Carolina Chickadee does not do much excavating, so wood chips are not necessary. 4-15 feet 1 1/8″ round 30 feet
Carolina Wren Forests with thick underbrush, forest edges, woodland clearings, open forests, shrub lands, suburban gardens, parks, backyards; near trees or tall shrubs 3-6 feet 1 1/2″ round, or 2 1/2″ x 5″ slot 330 feet
Chestnut-backed Chickadee Coniferous forests, mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, forest edges, woodlands, thickets, burned areas, often near streams; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1″ wood shavings can be placed in box 5-15 feet 1 1/8″ round 160 feet
Common Goldeneye Breeding habitat is limited to aquatic areas with dead trees, in boreal, deciduous, aspen and montane woods; favor calm, large, clear lakes without much vegetation or fish. Please several inches of wood shavings in the box in early spring. 6-30 feet 3 1/4″ high x 4 1/4″ wide 2/3 mile
Eastern Bluebird Open field or lawn; orchards; open, rural country with scattered trees and low or sparse ground cover; entrance hole should face open field, preferring east, north, south, and then west-facing directions 3-6 feet 1 1/2″ diameter (round), or 2 1/4″ high x 1 3/8″ wide (oval) 300 feet
Eastern Screech-Owl Forests, parks, woodland clearings, forest edges, wooded stream edges, under a tree limb. Add 2″-3″ of wood shavings 10-30 feet 3″ round 100 feet
European Starling Habitat generalists, nesting in areas ranging from rural and agricultural to suburban and urban areas, but they avoid heavily wooded, mountainous, and arid regions providing nest boxes is discouraged for this species in the U.S. can squeeze through holes with 1 9/16″ diameter 5 feet
Great Crested Flycatcher Deciduous or mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, forest edges, woodlots, orchards, parks, on post or tree at forest edge 3-20 feet 1 3/4″ round 1 box per 6 acres
Hooded Merganser Quiet, shallow, clear water pools surrounded by or near the edge of deciduous woods: small forest pools, ponds, swamps; add 3″ of wood shavings; add ladder under inside of entrance hole for young to climb out 6-25 feet 3″ high by 4″ wide horizontal oval 100 feet
House Sparrow Agricultural, suburban, and urban areas; tend to avoid woodlands, forests, grasslands, and deserts providing nest boxes is discouraged for this species in the U.S. can fit through holes with 1 1/4″ diameter variable
House Wren Variety of habitats, farmland, openings, open forests, forest edges, shrub lands, suburban gardens, parks, backyards; near trees or tall shrubs 5-10 feet 1″ round 100 feet
Mountain Bluebird Open field or lawn; orchards; open, rural country with scattered trees and low or sparse ground cover; will also use deciduous and coniferous forest edges; entrance hole should face open field, preferring east, north, south, and then west-facing directions 4-6 feet 1 9/16″ diameter 300 feet
Mountain Chickadee Coniferous forests, forest edges, woodland clearings; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1″ wood shavings can be placed in box 5-15 feet 1 1/8″ round 1 box per 10 acres
Northern Flicker Pastures, groves, woodlots, orchards, fields, meadows, woodland clearings, forest edges, urban parks, on pole or tree at forest edge or along fence rows bordering crop fields; south or east facing; box should be completely filled with wood chips or shavings 6-12 feet 2 1/2″ round 330 feet
Prothonotary Warbler Lowland hardwood forests subject to flooding, stagnant water, swamps, ponds, marshes, streams, flooded river valleys, wet bottomlands; box should be over or near water 4-12 feet 1 1/4″ round 235 feet
Purple Martin Broad open areas (meadows, fields, farmland, swamps, ponds, lakes, rivers) with unobstructed space for foraging on flying insects; there should be no trees or buildings within 40 feet of the martin pole in any direction; houses should be painted white 10-15 feet 2 1/8″ round or 3″ wide x 1 3/16″ high crescent 10 feet
Red-breasted Nuthatch Mixed coniferous-deciduous forests, shrub lands, swamps, farmlands, suburban parks; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1″ wood shavings can be placed in box 5-15 feet 1 1/4″ round 150 feet
Tree Swallow Open fields near water, expansive open areas, marshes, meadows, wooded swamps; on a post in open areas near tree or fence, east facing 5-6 feet 1 3/8″ round 35 feet
Tufted Titmouse Deciduous forest, thick timber stands, woodland clearings, forest edges, woodlots, riparian and mesquite habitats; hole should face away from prevailing wind 5-15 feet 1 1/4″ round 580 feet
Violet-green Swallow Open or broken deciduous or mixed deciduous-coniferous forests, wooded canyons, edges of dense forest 9-15 feet 1 3/8″ round 30 feet
Western Bluebird open field or lawn; orchards; open, rural country with scattered trees and low or sparse ground cover; will also use deciduous and coniferous forest edges; entrance hole should face open field, preferring east, north, south, and then west-facing directions 4-6 feet 1 1/2″ diameter 215 feet
Western Screech-Owl Lower elevations, forests, parks, woodland clearings, forest edges, deserts, wooded stream edges, under a tree limb, south or east facing. Add 2″-3″ of wood shavings 10-30 feet 3″ round 1,000 feet
White-breasted Nuthatch Deciduous woodlands, mature forests, woodlots, near open areas, forest edges, orchards, often near water; hole should face away from prevailing wind; 1″ wood shavings can be placed in box 5-20 feet 1 1/4″ round 1,040 feet
Wood Duck Forested wetlands or near marshes, swamps, and beaver ponds; boxes can be installed on posts or poles in water, at least 3 feet above the high water mark, facing south or west. If installing on land, choose a site within 100 feet of water with no branches near the entrance hole and with a predator guard. Place 4 inches of wood shaving in box floor. Box should have fledgling ladder inside entrance hole to enable young to climb out. 6-30 feet 4″ wide, 3″ high 600 feet